Recycling, Cubed: The Greenest House in San Francisco

This green pioneering house makes Earth Day proud.

It features a rainwater catchment system that collects up to 20,000 gallons of water annually, cleans it and stores it in tanks below the house. It uses 100-year-old railroad ties from Southeast Asia for flooring in its great room.

It has solar panels on its roof that generate electricity and produce the hot water that circulates through the subfloor system to provide radiant heating for the whole house. It even touts hemp carpets colored with vegetable dye, insulation made from natural denim and cotton fibers, plus an environmentally friendly interior paint.

It is a 4-bedroom, 4-bath house atop Clipper Street in San Francisco’s Noe Valley, a few blocks down the hill from where I once lived. This 2,600-square-foot green pioneering home just sold for about $350/sq.ft., or $1.89 million dollars.

With all this, this home is being called “the greenest house in San Francisco” and perhaps, it can be a shining beacon of how future homes should be built with nothing but renewable resources.

Read the story in SF Gate.

Posted by Gil Zeimer on April 22, 2006 in Travel

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